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Household Sanitation

Contents

  1. 1 NGOs and CBOs experiences in delivering water and sanitation services to the Urban Poor;
  2. 2 Sanitation in the fringe area: Masindi Town Council.
  3. 3 This study report highlights the sanitation conditions in the fringe areas of Masindi Town Council.  The objective of the study was to assess the sanitation situation in the fringe areas to obtain baseline data that would be used to, among others, design a sanitation promotion campaign, determine appropriate sanitation methods, quantify sanitation needs, and estimate costs for intervention.
  4. 4 DWD Mid-Western Towns Water and Sanitation Project.
  5. 5 January 2003,
  6. 6 Sanitation in the fringe area  Hoima Town Council;
  7. 7 Directorate of Water Development: Mid-Western Towns Water and Sanitation Project.
  8. 8 The study sought to establish the sanitation situation in the fringe areas of Hoima Town Council so as to design a sanitation promotion campaign, determine appropriate sanitation methods, and quantify sanitation needs.  The study involved 550 households.
  9. 9 January 2003,
  10. 10 16 Pages.
  11. 11 Health related behaviours in Bukalimo village, Kamuli district, and Mpande/Nakazinga Iganga district;
  12. 12 The majority of respondents indicated they washed hands to remove visible dirt.”  This one of the findings of the Health Related Behaviour Study, conducted in the in Bukalimo village Kamuli district, and Mpande/Nakazinga village Iganga district.  The villages were benefiting from the RUWASA project intervention for better water supply and improved sanitation.  The study involved 100 households from each of the two villages.  One of the objectives of the study was to establish the knowledge, attitude, and practices of the community in relation to advocated health behaviour.
  13. 13 Narathius Asingwire for RUWASA project,

Good Practices in Community Led Total Sanitation

 The Global picture on sanitation and children Worldwide, inadequate sanitation facilities contribute to the deaths of thousands of women and children.                           Globally, 2.6 billion people do not have access to improved sanitation, with a big percentage from the sub-Saharan Africa. Over nine million children under                 the age of 5 die annually largely due to preventable water, sanitation and hygiene-related diseases. This calls for improved access to safe water and                                  sanitation services in order to improve people’s health.

Plan’s global and regional approach to sanitation Plan’s overall goal on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) is to see children and youth meet their right to                 safe, reliable and affordable drinking water supplies, to hygienic sanitation, and to a clean environment. Since this is critical for the survival and                                        development of children, as well as for the economic well-being of their families and communities, Plan pursues this goal by promoting high impact low cost approaches for sanitation improvement, such as Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS), and by supporting community and school-led efforts, as well as those of government, the private sector, and civil society partners.
    

Plan introduced CLTS in the country in 2007. Later that year, the initiative was launched in Uganda with training support from Plan Kenya and Network for                 Water and Sanitation (NETWAS) a Ugandan networking organization in the water and sanitation sector. This started with a national level training                                        programme targeting district-level government staff, Village Health Teams (VHTs) and selected community members. Read More


Documentation of Best Operational Practices (BOP) in Hygiene and Sanitation in the districts of Uganda.

This report presents findings from a detailed study about the Best Operational Practices (BOP) in Sanitation Initiatives implemented in the districts of Busia, Gulu and Rakai.  It highlights the different BOP approaches as implemented by the different districts, the achievements registered as well as the operational challenges faced and the recommendations thereof.  The report is useful for Sanitation and Hygiene Programme designers and promoters at all level, both government and NGOs.

Mpalanyi J. and Mukama D.

December 2006

74 pages.

 

Final narrative Completion report for Kadindimo Community  Water, Hygiene and Sanitation Project; Implemented in Kadindimo Parish.  Rwimi Sub-County. Kabarole District.

Sanitation situation can greatly be improved through area specific programmes as was demonstrated by the Kandindimo Community Water, Hygiene, and Sanitation Project under HEWASA Programme, Western Uganda

HEWASA Programme;

August 2006,

14 Pages.

 

NGOs and CBOs experiences in delivering water and sanitation services to the Urban Poor;

In Uganda very few NGOs have ventured into providing water and sanitation services to the urban poor largely due to the challenges of working in an urban environment.  This report provides highlights of NGO/CBO contribution towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals, working with urban communities.  It presents challenges and lessons learnt.  The report targets development practitioners working with the urban poor promoting participatory approaches.

UWASNET,

March 2006,

9 Pages.


Sanitation in the fringe area: Masindi Town Council.

This study report highlights the sanitation conditions in the fringe areas of Masindi Town Council.  The objective of the study was to assess the sanitation situation in the fringe areas to obtain baseline data that would be used to, among others, design a sanitation promotion campaign, determine appropriate sanitation methods, quantify sanitation needs, and estimate costs for intervention.

DWD Mid-Western Towns Water and Sanitation Project.

January 2003,

18 pages

Sanitation in the fringe area  Hoima Town Council;

Directorate of Water Development: Mid-Western Towns Water and Sanitation Project.

The study sought to establish the sanitation situation in the fringe areas of Hoima Town Council so as to design a sanitation promotion campaign, determine appropriate sanitation methods, and quantify sanitation needs.  The study involved 550 households.

January 2003,

18 pages

 


 

Urban Water Supply and Sanitation Project; Western Uganda.

The report is on the Public Health Education Component of the Urban Water Supply and Sanitation Project for Western Uganda implemented in the towns of Kasese and Fort Portal.  This component had been implemented in the last months of the project after engineering works.  The Public Health Education Component aimed at making the people in the towns aware of the health benefits met to be derived from the improved water supply (both towns) and sewerage systems (Fort Portal town) constructed and to be made aware of their responsibilities in using the services.  Presented are the strategies used in delivering the public health education and the outcome The report is beneficial for all involved in the designing and implementation of Sanitation and Hygiene promotion under  water and sanitation projects in urban and peri-urban areas.

GITEC Consult GMBH, Habitat Consultants

September 1997

53 pages


Household Pit Latrine Construction guidelines;

 

All families should have access to excreta disposal facilities.  The Household Pit Latrine Guide targets community level sanitation and hygiene promoters as well as local artisans as it provides step by step guide on how to construct a pit latrine

RUWASA Project,

September 1994,

16 Pages.

 

Health related behaviours in Bukalimo village, Kamuli district, and Mpande/Nakazinga Iganga district;

The majority of respondents indicated they washed hands to remove visible dirt.”  This one of the findings of the Health Related Behaviour Study, conducted in the in Bukalimo village Kamuli district, and Mpande/Nakazinga village Iganga district.  The villages were benefiting from the RUWASA project intervention for better water supply and improved sanitation.  The study involved 100 households from each of the two villages.  One of the objectives of the study was to establish the knowledge, attitude, and practices of the community in relation to advocated health behaviour.

Narathius Asingwire for RUWASA project,

March 1994,

Pages 45.



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